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The following are clippings from the local newspaper and t.v. about the accident. 

McCabe Richard McCabe 8/10/55 - 12/20/03 Will be greatly missed by his wife, Martha; his sons, Erick and Tait and so very many family and friends. Rick loved the outdoors, scouting, fishing, hunting, canoeing, sailing, boats, maple syruping, building, and rock concerts, but it was because of his love of people that he was affectionately called "The Schmooze." Rick lived every minute of his life to the fullest and he filled every room that he was in. He died with his friend Pete in a tragic plane accident. Memorial service 10 AM Saturday at Westminster Presbyterian Church (12th St. & Nicollet Mall, Mpls). Visitation Friday, 3-7 PM at Rettinger Funeral Home, Long Lake. Visitation also 1 hour prior to service at church. In lieu of flowers, please direct memorials to Richard McCabe Memorial (State Bank of Maple Plain, 4980 Highway 12, PO Box 279, Maple Plain, MN 55359). Rettinger Funeral Home Long Lake 952-473-6954
Published in the Minneapolis Star Tribune from 12/22/2003 - 12/23/2003.

By Fox 9:
Two Minnesota Men Die In Plane Crash
A single engine airplane crashed through the ice of a northern Wisconsin lake today, killing the two men aboard.
The Burnett County Sheriff's Department says efforts are under way to recover the bodies of the two men, both believed to be from the Twin Cities area.
The recovery efforts are being hampered by a deep layer of mud on the lake bottom.
The sheriff's department was notified just after two p-m that the plane had crashed through the ice on Hanscom Lake in the town of Scott.
Officials say the 1963 Mooney aircraft took off from Voyager Village Airport, flew north from the runway, banked and apparently lost power.
It crashed through the ice about 200 yards from the west and south shore and broke up on impact.
Names of the men aboard are being withheld pending notification of relatives.
(Copyright 2003 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
12/20/2003

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Star Tribune:

Investigators seek cause of plane crash
Associated Press
 Published December 22, 2003
PLAN23
WEBB LAKE, Wis. -- The National Transportation Safety Board is investigating in an effort to determine what caused the weekend crash of a single-engine plane in a frozen northern Wisconsin lake, killing two men.
The bodies of the men were recovered at about 7 p.m. Saturday, about five hours after the 1963 Mooney aircraft crashed on Hanscom Lake in the town of Scott about 80 miles northwest of Eau Claire.
Webb Lake and Scott Township Police Chief David Lein said the plane landed in 3 to 4 feet of water, with a good portion of its fuselage stuck in mud. He said there was 6 to 8 inches of ice.
Lein declined to release the identities of the victims Monday morning, but the Saint Paul Pioneer Press quoted family members as saying they were pilot Peter Naab, 49, of Long Lake, Minn., and Rick McCabe, 48, of Maple Plain, Minn., both in the Twin Cities area.
Officials said the aircraft took off from Voyager Village Airport in Voyager Village, flew north from the runway, banked and apparently lost power.
The plane crashed through the ice about 200 yards from the west and south shore and broke up on impact.
When Terry Naab found out about the crash involving her husband, she was so shocked she thought it had to be a joke. She said her husband was an experienced pilot who often flew with his family and friends.
``He loved flying; that was his total passion,'' she said.
The deaths were also hard for the McCabe family to believe.
``There was several hours of hope, I think, that they were going to be able to recover them,'' said Dan Willett, McCabe's brother-in-law.
Both families say they will try to maintain their holiday plans this week.
``I need to have family and friends around me now,'' Terry Naab said.

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Star Tribune:
Victims in plane crash were best friends
Paul Levy, Star Tribune
Published December 23, 2003
PLAN23
When Peter Naab and Rick McCabe boarded Naab's single-engine airplane Saturday, there seemed little reason for concern. Naab, 47, of Medina, an experienced pilot, "felt most comfortable when he was in the air," his son, Ben, said Monday.
McCabe, 48, of Maple Plain, was no pilot, but he "wasn't shy about flying," said his brother, Gil. And he'd do almost anything or go anywhere with his buddy Naab.
"When somebody told Rick something was stupid, he could always call Pete, and Rick could count on Pete," said McCabe's sister-in-law, Vicki Willett. "I guess the only thing that wasn't shocking about the crash was that they were together."
It could be months before the National Transportation Safety Board determines why the 1963 Mooney plane carrying Naab and McCabe crashed through the ice of Hanscomb Lake near the community of Webb Lake in northwestern Wisconsin, said Burnett, Wis., County Sheriff Dean Roland.
The plane, which crashed around 2 p.m. Saturday, was removed from the lake at noon Monday and was to be transferred to an airport in Siren, Wis., for examination.
Naab, a businessman who sold metal-carving machines, was closing his cabin near the Voyager Village airport for the winter. He'd planned to fly back to the Twin Cities with McCabe while Cort Naab, his 17-year-old son, returned to their home in Long Lake by car.
"It was his dream to build a cabin right on a golf course, and I'm sure he didn't want to leave his place on the fifth hole," said Naab's son Ben, 15.
"My brother told me that dad had just dropped him off and was going to warm up the plane," Ben Naab said. "The next thing Cort saw were police and ambulances."
Under ideal weather conditions, the plane left the 200-foot Voyager Village runway. The plane flew north, banked and apparently lost power.
With the plane submerged in three or four feet of water and in thick mud, it took rescue workers more than five hours to retrieve the bodies.
"My dad was the kind of personality that could fill a room," Ben Naab said. "One time, we flew to Colorado, just me and him, to ski. He saw a guy coming down a mountain dressed like Superman. So my dad wrapped long underwear around his head and said, 'Look, I'm Underwearman.'
"My dad wasn't Superman. But he tried to do everything and be everywhere."
McCabe, a Minneapolis Washburn High and University of Minnesota business graduate, may have been Naab's equal -- whether it came to getting noticed while making an entrance into a crowded room or giving his time to the Boy Scouts.
Naab and McCabe seemed to have everything in common: Both had long, successful marriages. Each had two teenage sons. Both loved the outdoors and seemed willing to do anything for one another. Or anyone else, for that matter.
"We were talking about how much of his equipment was loaned out," said Gil McCabe, Rick's brother. "You could ask a favor and -- boom! -- he'd be right there."
Services for McCabe will be held at 10 a.m. Saturday at Westminster Presbyterian Church, 12th St. at Nicollet Mall, Minneapolis, with visitation one hour before.
Services for Naab will be held at 3 p.m. Saturday at Maple Plain Community Church, 1815 Budd Av., Maple Plain, with visitation an hour before.
Visitation for both Naab and McCabe will be held Friday at Rettinger Funeral Home, 425 N. Brown Rd., Long Lake.
Paul Levy is at
>plevy@startribune.com.

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Pioneer Press:
Posted on Mon, Dec. 22, 2003 story:PUB_DESC
BURNETT COUNTY, WIS.: Crash claimed 2 from metro area
BY RACHEL E. STASSEN-BERGER
Pioneer Press
Peter Naab and Rick McCabe were fun, family-loving, entrepreneurial men and fast friends.
Naab, of Long Lake, and McCabe, of Maple Plain, had known each other for several years, and they had planned a quick trip to Wisconsin together this past weekend.
The two died Saturday afternoon when the small 1963 Mooney plane Naab was flying crashed in a shallow, icy Wisconsin lake.
The airplane had taken off from Voyager Village Airport, a small airstrip attached to a Wisconsin cabin community, on Saturday afternoon. The plane lost power and crashed into Hanscom Lake a few hundred yards away, according to the Burnett County Sheriff's Department. The plane broke into pieces on impact.
While federal officials worked Sunday to remove the wreckage and begin their investigation, the men's families worked to deal with the reality of their instant loss.
When Terry Naab found out about the crash, she was so shocked she thought it had to be a joke. Her husband, she said, was an experienced pilot who often flew with his family and friends.
"He loved flying; that was his total passion," she said.
So when her husband planned to fly up to the Naab family cabin near Webster, Wis., with the Naabs' 18-year-old son to fix some snowmobiles, it wasn't very unusual. The plan was for Cort Naab to drive back and Naab, 49, and McCabe, 48, to fly back to the Twin Cities area Saturday.
Instead, Terry Naab got a phone call from Cort telling her of the crash.
Her first thought? "That he was kidding," she said. Cort was near the crash site and saw the commotion of the crash.
It was hard for McCabe's family to believe Rick was gone, too.
"There was several hours of hope, I think, that they were going to be able to recover them," said Dan Willett, McCabe's brother-in-law.
But Willett learned from law enforcement officials Sunday that the two men probably died instantly.
Naab, who was in sales, and McCabe, a small-business owner, got the most out of their too-brief lives, those close to them said.
"Peter was a man that took life and lived it to the fullest," Terry Naab said. "He never did anything halfway."
"(Rick) was the kind of guy that would just pack as much into the day that he could," said Willett. "He always had a smile on his face."
In addition to their wives each man was married for more than 20 years Naab and McCabe each leave behind two teenage sons. Naab's sons are 18 and 15, and McCabe's 17(Actually 16) and 14.
Both families say they will try to maintain their holiday plans this week.
"I need to have family and friends around me now," said Terry Naab. She plans to arrange for services after Christmas.
The McCabe family plans to have a memorial service Saturday at Westminster Presbyterian Church in Minneapolis.
The Burnett County Sheriff's Department plans to release more information about the crash today. The final report on the crash investigation could take months, said Bob Handschiegel, regional operations officer at the Federal Aviation Administration Great Lakes regional office.

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Pioneer Press:
Posted on Tue., Dec. 23, 2003 story:PUB_DESC
BURNETT COUNTY:
Pioneer Press
All wreckage of a single-engine airplane had been removed by Monday from the shallow Wisconsin lake it crashed into Saturday. The crash killed two Twin Cities men.
Web Lake Township Police Chief David Lein said Monday that the wreckage has been taken to the Burnett County Government Center in Siren, where Federal Aviation Administration officials and others will use it in the investigation into the cause of the crash. Gathering the wreckage was difficult because of the lake's thin ice
The pilot of the 1963 Mooney plane, Peter Charles Naab, 47, of Long Lake, and his friend, Richard Hughes McCabe, 48, of Maple Plain, died Saturday afternoon after taking off from the Voyager Village Airstrip.
Based on about five witnesses accounts, Lein said investigators have pieced together the events, but the cause is not expected to be determined for some time.
The two men took off about 2:10 p.m. Saturday. The plane then flew over the pilot's cabin near Hanscom Lake and was about 100 feet above the tree line. It appeared that the plane began a landing pattern after passing the tree line, above the lake. The plane dropped about 60 feet while the motor sounded like it was operating at full power.
The plane then began a rapid climb to about 300 feet at a very steep angle, before going into a "dead stall." The plane then fell backward and banked to the left, losing altitude and slamming into the ice.
The plane's front section broke off and was partially submerged, although the craft remained on the ice.
The victims were removed about 7:10 p.m. The crash site was about three-tenths of a mile north of a boat landing, and the plane had landed about 200 feet from an icehouse that was on the lake.
Thin ice, estimated to be between 6 and 8 inches, complicated recovery of the men and plane's wreckage, Lein said.
Emergency crews could only use ATVs or snowmobiles, which they borrowed from The Main Store and Four Star Sports in Webb Lake Township.

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